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Worksheets Downloads2022-01-18T23:53:16+00:00

ELabU is a collection of education finance instructional modules developed by Edunomics Lab, Georgetown University designed to provide the hands-on finance skills education practitioners and policy makers need to make strategic financial decisions and tradeoffs on behalf of students. It is not a scripted curriculum. Modules include options for how to deliver the content (or relevant components of it) as it makes sense for individual educational and training contexts.

Email us at edunomics@georgetown.edu. Thank you!


Activity Only:
A quick download that can be incorporated into lessons or trainings

Complete Instructional Module:
Complete lesson module including presentation slides, facilitator notes,
supplemental readings and follow on activities

View from
the School

Participants take on the role of school principal and decide how to spend finite dollars at their building.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Reading District Budgets

This activity teaches participants how to read and understand district budget documents.

Activity Only
Complete Module

State Finance Policies

Participants will learn how K-12 education is funded and how various revenue sources can impact equity.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Debt and Bonds

This hands-on activity leads participants through real-life debt and bond scenarios and tradeoffs.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Array the Data

Participants compare per-pupil spending across a district’s highest- and lowest-poverty schools.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Three District Allocation Models

Students will learn the three main models that describe how resources are distributed to schools.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Case Studies

Participants weigh tradeoffs in a highly interactive way, looking at real decisions districts have made.

Activity Only
Complete Module

Financial Implications of Pensions

Asynchronous Module Coming Soon!

This research was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through R305U200003 to Georgetown University.
The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute or the U.S. Department of Education.